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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
palace, another witness telling us there's been one clash between protesters and police after demonstrators started throwing rocks, debris, other objects, at police and police responded by firing at least one round of tear gas. for the most part, these demonstrations near the presidential palace have been peaceful, but with this clash, we're going to keep our eyes on things to to see if that leads to more violence. this is the first time these opposition factions have marched towards the presidential palace. this is, of course, part of today's big demonstration that opposition factions have dubbed the final warning, the seculars, moderates, liberals, women's rights groups protesting the president, his decrees in the process by which this constitution has been drafted. while that's happening at presidential palace you have another group of people, about 5,000, 10,000 people protesting here in tahrir square, again with chants of "cancel, cancel, we won't leave until he leaves" a reference to president morsi. the deck seems to be stacked against them and the moment seems to have
but taking away some of the tax deductions used by the top 2% of wage earners. the president answered, not enough revenue unless you end charitable deductions, et cetera, less rooempb equals more cuts in education, et cetera. i'm joined by gloria borger now. >> how about that et cetera? >> you like the et cetera. they got two very different proposals on the table right now. >> they're speaking past each other. they seem to be really living in different universes or one on mars, one on venus, whatever you want to call it. look, it's very clear. one of the republicans want more entitlement cuts up front. and the democrats want these tax increases on the wealthy up front. the irony here to me watching this is in the long term, the second part of this, everybody seems to know what needs to be done. they know you've got to fix entitlement spending. they know you've got to reform the tax code to make it simpler and to make it fairer. the big problem they've got is how you get from here to there. and right now, in order to get over this hump, they sort of are in the position of putting every
now!" >> there is this long standing relationship, should give us pause about the people we support today because we don't know what sort of consequences we may be engineering tomorrow. >> we speak with matthieu aikins who is just returned from two months in pakistan, examining what led to the capture and killing of osama bin laden. his piece is called, "the doctor, the cia, and the blood of bin laden." that is the african national congress in south africa votes to support a boycott divestment and sanctions, we look at a new film "road map to apartheid." >> i have been able to visit israel and palestine on more than two occasions. and what i experienced there was such a cruel reminder of a at a painful to protest south africa. we were largely controlled in the same way. >> we will speak with the israeli and south african born co-director of the film, then reverend billy on the end of the world. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. people across the united states are expected to join a moment of silence
of conflict? do we want to look at legislation? do we want to put policies in place that allow us to defend ourselves before we get to a point where we say, i wish that teacher had it. by the time we get to that point, it was too late. >> hailey, were your surprised by the press conference? >> i have been optimistic for the official statement all week, and i have to say i was very disappointed. i think that their statement was a pretty huge disservice to their membership and all, i know wonderful members of the nra who have fantastic expertise, are very smart, are very, could be wonderful resources in this. and i really think that statement did not reflect any sort of an engaging discourse and engaging in dialogue. i was shocked at how much of a monologue it was, actually. >> and there's this emerging idea, and i think it is an emerging idea that's a hopeful idea in liberal circles, so i want to reality check it, that there's this gap between the nra and its membership. you will see this statistic on polling and about specific regulatory initiatives. and i'm just curious how much you think
in the assault on the u.s. consulate there. while susan rice was not responsible for security of the consulate, she did go on sunday shows and talk about the u.s. response there and she has been accused of deliberately mischaracterizing what happened. all sides -- or the white house has adamantly insisted and she has insisted that she in no way deliberately mischaracterized what happened. she was reading from unclassified talking points and nonetheless this has been caught up in a back and forth and, wolf, if i may, i'm going to read from part of her statement, her letter to the president and what she wrote in part, i am now convinced that the confirmation process will be lengthy, disruptive, and costly to you and to our most pressing national and international priorities. that tradeoff is simply not worth it to our country. the secretary of state may never be politicized. she says, i look forward to building on progress in your second term which seems to leave the door open to the possibility she could serve in the administration in the second term and according to my sources there has been s
for joining us. have a great night. see you right back here tomorrow. ♪ lew: good evening, everybody. u.s. foreign policy in the middle east in question at this hour. violence spiring out of control in syria after 20 months of civil unrest and the deaths of at least 40,000 murdered civilians at the hands of their own government. united states and nato agreeing to deploy patriot weapons and to thwart an aso-called by assad. the missile systems to be positioned near the syria. his staff denies that and estimates if they were deploy troops, it requires 75,000 of the troops in a full ground invasion in order to seize the chemical weapon stockpile. fox news confirming they were not ordered to draft the consideration of such a mission. secretary of state clinton is nonetheless talking very tough calling for assad to step down as the obama administration has done for the past 15 months, but refusing, still, to detail which consequences those would be. >> we will explore with like-minded countries what more we can do to bring the conflict to an end, but that will require the assad regime making t
>> at the country, our best years are still ahead of us. mr. president for my will and my remarks today where our country began a long time ago. with the dream and a pair that god will continue to bless the united states of america. >> tomorrow night, watch the farewell speech by republican senator dick lugar and democratic representative lynn woolsey of california. we will also show you a tribute in the u.s. house to outgoing caliber and california members of cameras.. join us at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. later a look at the dodd-frank law and regulations. >> this is c-span3 with politics and public affairs programming throughout the week. and every weekend, 40 hours a people and events ,-com,-com ma telling the american story on american history tv. get schedules in the past programs our website. you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> tomorrow a draft constitution by mohammed morsi. it would expand his constitutional powers. supporters and opponents of president mohammed morsi. next, we'll talk about developments in the country and security throughout the
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
of us who had the privilege to serve with you. i hope and i pray that god will give you and your wife many, many more years of life and enjoyment because you have certainly earned it, because you have served not only the united states house of representatives, but you have served us, you have served the people of our districts as well as helping us be better members of congress. so with that i will close by asking god to please bless you and your family and may god continue to bless the house of representatives and jay pearson, you will be in our hearts until the day we die. god bless you. . mr. woodall: at this time, it's migrate pleasure to yield the gentleman from california, chairman of the ways and means health subcommittee, mr. herger. mr. herger: i thank my good friend. how wonderful it is to be able to sit here and listen to all these incredibly warm remarks from people who, like myself, know and love jay pearson. and there's a reason for that. jay, you're one of the best of the best. and i think, it's hard to believe that 26 years comes and goes so very, very quickly, but it
've gotten us into, bring a balanced budget to the table to grow this economy for the long term not the short term. >> there you go. for the long term, not the short term. >> there you go. i'm don lemon. happy new year to you. jooirksz . >>> hello, i'm don lemon and this is cnn's top 10 of 2012. we look at the stories that captured our attention, what we see as the biggest stories of the year around the world, in crime, money, weather and even the biggestscandals and later this hour, those stories chosen by you. anchor of state of the union, candy crowley, with the top ten political stories of 2012. >>> like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. impossible number of possibilities. catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business you didn't build that. >> i like being aable to find service members. >> i'm an american woman who uses contraception. let's start there. >> it's like an etch-a-sketch. you shake it up and we start all over again. >> i'm not going to shut up. it's my turn. >> i think it's called romneysia. >> if i were to coin a term it would be obamaloney. >> the
impression on a great many people around the world, and especially on the 100 of us who serve here. he commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for
us from england, and to make us free. human rights day is about advancing equality and the american constitution as it has expanded over the years to include new groups of people and strike down barriers of race and gender, ethnic background, national origin. it is about the progress of human rights and equality, the noblest of causes for this nation and what brings us together in many ways as americans. the fight for freedom. the search for equality. and justice. and i want to talk about three specific ways that we can advance the cause of human rights in this chamber, in this session through measures that are before us. the first concerns human trafficking. i've been particularly interested in the rampant human trafficking problems on american bases abroad in places like iraq and afghanistan. victims are recruited from third countries like bangladesh and the philippines and charged exorbitant fees to travel to their work sites often misled about where they're going, what that are salaries will be and what their living conditions will be like. frequently their passports are confisc
that told the story. the war blur that richard nixon used to trap him in the cross-examination, and these things, they live in a mythological memory. it was in the "new york times" three weeks ago or so in a box, you know, a-11, a war blur appeared in new york city in manhattan, and times photographed it, making the reference to this work we're going to talk about today, and then, i think, a classic status was enhanced by the seemingly never ending decades of controversy in which the defenders tried to make slanders of the authors of witness stick. today, i want to introduce the three panelists. this is an amazingly powerful group we have here. all at once. leave it to them. they will take it over. each, i hope, making remarks ten minute, and we'll open it up for further discussion. elliot a -- abrams had a remarkable strings of enormous importance. i remember him going back to the early reagan years. he began my knowledge with human rights, and that was really something, the jimmy carter invention of human rights, and in charge of latin american affairs, positions
of a task force to curb gun violence. >> if those of us who were sent here to serve the public trust can summon even one tiny iota of the courage those teachers, that principal, in newtown summoned on friday, if cooperation and common sense prevail, then i'm convinced we can make a sensible, intelligent way to make the united states of america a safer -- >> well, the president's statement gets largely overshadowed by questions about the fiscal cliff, a final question hits home. >> this is not the first issue, the first incident with horrific gun violence of your four years. where have you been? >> well, here's where i've been, jake, i've been president of the united states dealing with the worst economic crisis since the great depression, an auto industry on the verge of collapse, two wars. i don't think i've been on vacation. and, so, i think all of us have to do some reflection on how we prioritize what we do here in washington. >>> in newtown today, funerals for five of the victims, including principal dawn hochsprung and teacher victoria soto. classes will resume for sandy
the audience all of us have chapters in our lives, milestones. my important -- my most important chapter, he said, was a battle creek chapter. this is where i learned what democracy was all about. wherei learned what america wasl about. -- where i learned what america was all about. to impart any lessons about america on dan inouye would have been an honor but we may have taught him pales in comparison to what he tots. a few years ago danny told an audience that our greatness as a nation lies in part in our willingness to recognize the flaws in our past, including our treatment of japanese-americans, and our determination in whatever limited way we could to make amends. dan inouye served his country because of his dream of what we could be, a nation unbound by our all-too-human failings. he believed to his core that we are able to shed old prejudices and that our nation, de despiter flaws, shines with such bright promise that we can inspire remarkable service and sacrifice. a nation so great that those we treat with disdain or even hatred can respond with love that knows no limit. love is po
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
have always carried a little recording device of some sort. they used to be pretty big, but now they are quite small, and i always carry a pen and paper, and i am ready if something occurs to me. >> you mentioned merle travis. what other musicians? >> ry cooder is my favorite guitar player, but there are many others to choose from. there was an album that was a formative for me. "paradise and lunch." there was a guy coming up called tom rush who played here at the cellar door, and he played in boston at the 47. i really pattern myself after, just a guy with a guitar, full position, unapologetic. -- falcon musician. unapologetic folk musician. and i would say wouldtwo and the beatles. >> what do you think of current pop music? >> you know, i guess i do not like it a whole lot. [laughter] [applause] >> i guess i don't like it a whole lot. >> what would we find -- >> i sound just like my dad. there are great people out there, i know it. and i don't mean to condemn it but i think it's passed me by a little bit. i still have a wonderful career and a beautiful audience that i really l
to this story. >> what was amazing to us and what was relevant is the idea that nowhere on american television had a returning soldier returning from war been portrayed. and obviously in very circumstances in the case of our character, but that was something that really interested us but it felt like a good way to dramatize a lot of the questions we answered on "24" in a more knew answer fashion ten years after 9/11. a lot of questions that weren't clear then are even more complex now. what do we have to be afraid of? what's the price of our security? and these are the characters we created to ask those questions. >> and michael, with "the queen" what prompted that? decpwhrit came from another deal. it was a trilogy of films. the deal was a film made for british television about the supposed deal that was made between tony blair and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)